Why Free Parking Is Costing Us An Awful Lot

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I recommend three policies. First, charge the right price for curb parking, by which I mean the lowest price that will leave one or two spaces open on every block, so no one has to cruise for parking. Second, spend the meter revenue to pay for added public services on the metered streets, so residents and merchants can see the meter money at work for them. Third, remove the minimum off-street parking requirements.

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100% Renewable Energy Goal Is What Cities Need

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Now that the other two big California cities, San Diego and San Francisco, seem poised to implement official 100% renewable energy goals, the City of Los Angeles will have even encouragement to think about taking the leap. The fact that many major non-profits have also recently jumped on board to call for 100% renewable energy, and that a rapidly growing number of major businesses, cities, and even states like Hawaii are setting 100% renewable electricity targets, will add to the push. Remember that just a short time ago, the idea of 100% renewable energy was way outside any mainstream thinking…

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Los Angeles Leading The Market On Water Conservation

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There is a very accelerated effort to capture water, not only at the large storm water catch basins that we have but also to try to do smaller capture projects. There are only so many big storm rains, there is only so much public property. What we need to do now is to try to catch smaller rains and water flowing down on the side of the streets. We need to do things like bioswales, green streets, places where water can percolate into the ground.

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The Future of Infrastructure in Los Angeles

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Some of the key observations of the report are: Los Angels ranks third out of four U.S. major cities for public transport use. Only 20% use public transport while 74% rely on private transport. Residents of L.A. consume less electricity per person than in the other U.S. cities and wealthier global cities. Electricity in L.A. is some of the greenest in the world. Air quality in L.A. is the worst amongst U.S. cities, but better than in international megacities.

Los Angeles vs. San Francisco – The Race To Solve Mobility Issues

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First of all, I think we are lucky to have both global cities in one state. One is the global capital of technology, and the other is the global capital of entertainment. The difference between the two is scale. People, for some reason, compare the two spaces but use different geographies. The city of Los Angeles is over 473 square miles, with 4 million people in the city, 11 million in the county and 20 million in the region. Whereas the city/county of San Francisco is 50 square miles with 825,000 people in a region of 7 million people. Another…

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